Health & Fitness
Here's why girls should never take diet pills Here's why girls should never take diet pills


London, Is your teenaged daughter popping pills to shed weight? Beware, she may be at an increased risk of harming hormones, growth as well as mental health, researchers warned.

The findings showed that diet pills are unsafe for all ages but especially for teenagers due to the presence of toxic chemicals in the supplements.

Artificial heart valve may cause sleep loss Artificial heart valve may cause sleep loss



London, Nearly one in four patients with an artificial heart valve are facing disturbance in their sleep, owing to the ticking sound produced by the machine, researchers say.

Chronic sleep deprivation can lead to serious health problems like heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke and diabetes etc.

The study showed that because the noise produced by the mechanical heart valve was audible to them or others, the patients tend to avoid socialising, which in turn can affect their quality of life as well as increase the risk of developing depression and anxiety.

Grilled or microwaved mushrooms may be more healthier Grilled or microwaved mushrooms may be more healthier



London, Love mushrooms? Boiling or deep frying may destroy its nutritional profile while microwaving or grilling them would help preserve its antioxidant capacity and other health properties, researchers say.

Mushrooms are rich in dietary fibre, vitamins (B1, B2, B12, C, D and E) and minerals such as zinc or selenium, low in calories and fat, as well as important source of betaglucans -- biologically active compounds with potential medicinal value.

Zika mosquito may transmit dengue with one bite Zika mosquito may transmit dengue with one bite



New York, The primary mosquito that spreads Zika virus -- aedes aegypti -- might also simultaneously transmit chikungunya and dengue viruses with a single bite, says a study that sheds new light on co-infection.

"A mosquito, in theory, could give you multiple viruses at once," said Claudia Ruckert, post-doctoral researcher at Colorado State University in the US.

Doctors say India's first uterus transplant successful Doctors say India's first uterus transplant successful



Pune Doctors on Friday declared the country's first uterus (womb) transplant on a 21-year-old woman successful, but said the patient is under observation and the next two days are crucial.

In a nine-hour surgery, doctors at Galaxy Care laparoscopy Institute on Thursday performed India's first uterus transplant on a woman from Kolhapur who was born without a uterus.

Eating fruits, vegetables secret to looking good Eating fruits, vegetables secret to looking good



Sydney, Eating enough fruit and vegetables could be the secret to looking good and having attractive skin, according to a study released on Friday by Australian researchers.

The researchers at the University of Newcastle, New South Wales, investigated how young Australians viewed faces in terms of attractiveness, by being able to adjust settings to create the most attractive version of different faces, based on levels of melanin (tanning), or carotenoid coloration which occurs when you consume fruits and vegetables.

Simple computer game may help kids choose healthy food Simple computer game may help kids choose healthy food



London, Worried that your children are addicted to unhealthy foods? Take heart -- a simple brain-training game could help them choose healthy snacks instead of chocolates and sweets, a study has showed.

The game involves reacting to images of healthy food by pressing a button, and doing nothing if unhealthy foods are shown.

The findings showed that children who played the seven-minute game made healthier choices when asked to pick foods afterwards.

Personal care products dominate online purchases Personal care products dominate online purchases



New Delhi, Personal care products still rule the roost in online purchases, a survey has revealed.

In the survey conducted by online shopping portal Deal Kya Hai?, 1349 respondents -- 913 men and 436 women -- answered 16 questions.

New engineered bone marrow may make transplants safer New engineered bone marrow may make transplants safer



New York, Team of US scientists led by an Indian origin researcher has developed biometric bone tissues that could provide new bone marrow for patients needing transplants as well as make the procedure much safer.

Before a transplant, a patient is first given doses of radiation, sometimes in combination with drugs, to kill off any existing stem cells in the patient's bone marrow.

This pre-treatment is meant to improve the success of the transplant by clearing up space in the marrow, allowing donor cells to survive and grow without competition from the patient's own cells.

Mid-life obesity-driven enzyme identified Mid-life obesity-driven enzyme identified

 

Washington, US researchers have said that they identified an enzyme that may play a central role in the development of obesity in mid-life.

In two groups of mice being fed high-fat foods, those who received an inhibitor that blocked the enzyme had a 40 per cent decrease in weight gain compared with those that did not get it, Xinhua news agency reported.

The findings, published in the US journal Cell Metabolism, could upend current notions about why people gain weight as they age, and could one day lead to more effective weight-loss medications.

10 minutes of daily meditation can ward off anxiety 10 minutes of daily meditation can ward off anxiety



Toronto, Just 10 minutes of daily meditation can help prevent your mind from wandering and is particularly effective if you tend to have repetitive, anxious thoughts, say researchers.

The team from the University of Waterloo found that developing an awareness of the present moment reduced incidents of repetitive, off-task thinking -- a hallmark of anxiety.

New eye test may detect early signs of glaucoma New eye test may detect early signs of glaucoma



London, Researchers have developed a simple eye test that could help solve the biggest global cause of irreversible blindness, glaucoma, by detecting the onset of the disease at a very early stage.

Loss of sight in patients with glaucoma is caused by the death of cells in the retina at the back of the eye. This cell death is called apoptosis.

Is there a positive side to worrying? Is there a positive side to worrying?



New York, A new study by a psychology professor at the University of California - Riverside shows that there is a positive side to worrying.

"Worry -- it does a body good. And, the mind as well," said Kate Sweeny in the paper published in Social and Personality Psychology Compass.

Make your skin, hair summer ready Make your skin, hair summer ready


New Delhi, How far would you go to avoid the summer heat? With all the sweat and grime in the air, it seems impossible to pull off healthy hair and skin, that stays for a few hours outdoors. By exfoliating, radiating and going minimal can have some positive results in warm weather. (15:14) 
Sangeeta Velaskar, Vice President and Head, Medical Services and R&D, Kaya Limited talks about how to keep your skin looking fresh, while TONI&GUY Global Hair Ambassador, Indira Schauwecker gives you tips and tricks on how to ace the minimalistic trend, debunks some common hair myths and recommends products so you can care for your mane better